The Boone County Buzz: Are you a gambler?

I am! No, you won’t ever find me at the casino. I’m talking about gardening! I think most of us who garden have a touch of the gambler in us. How else can you explain the leap of faith we take every year when we put our seeds or baby transplants out in the wild world dreaming of luscious produce to come? Sometimes things go well and some not so well. That’s just part of life.

Well, today I want to encourage the wildest gamblers out there to take a chance on REALLY early spring lettuce. You know how all the seed packages say to plant your lettuce from mid-March to mid-May? I think they’re missing the boat!

mixed baby lettuceI followed those recommendations for years and what always happened was that as my lettuce finally started to head up it became bitter! The bitterness used to start around mid-June but I’ve had it happen as early as mid-May when temperatures are unusually warm. As a crazed, baby lettuce aficionado this is most frustrating.

Then about 15 years ago I was reading some book (?) where an old woman from the Ozarks said to put your lettuce seed out as soon as the snow melted. This seemed like insanity, but, again, I’ve got a gambling streak. I tried it. Yes, I ran out with a cloth sheet to protect it a few times. But I was eating beautiful baby lettuce salads by the end of March! Needless to say, I’ve been doing this ever since.

When exactly do I take this risk? It varies with the weather and snow. Looking back in my garden diary (yes, you really should keep one) the first planting has been as early as January 5th but probably averages around January 25th. Have I lost my lettuce? Maybe once, but most varieties of lettuce can survive temperatures as low as 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Since lettuce seed is somewhat viable for up to 6 years I usually use old seed from a previous year, so if it is lost I won’t feel quite as bad. Sometimes, when the cravings are severe I’ve been known to start lettuce seeds inside in January and plunk the plants out in early February. Again, it’s a gamble but what an incredible payoff if you succeed! Take a chance!

Gardening Courses

The Columbia Area Career Center has several classes happening this spring that might be of interest to gardeners. These paid classes are offered by the Columbia Public Schools through the Professional and Community Education Program.

For information on dates, prices, class openings and online registration go to:
https://cacc.asapconnected.com/Courses.aspx?CourseGroupID=18858

ALSO: Mid-Missouri Expo—Small Farm to Backyard Garden is being offered by the Boone County MU Extension on Saturday, February 24 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Battle High School. There are going to be four topic areas with five concurrent sessions running on topics ranging from growing mushrooms, raising tomatoes, organic gardening, small animal rearing, pruning and much more. Pre-registration $7, door $10.

For more information go to http://extension.missouri.edu/boone/mid-moexpo.aspx

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Free Fruit Tree Workshop

apple treeYou are invited to a FREE fruit tree pruning workshop at Bethel Church Community Garden (201 E Old Plank Rd.) February 19 at 4 pm. Come learn from Jim Quinn, MU Extension horticulturist about how to get the most out of your fruit trees with pruning.

No RSVP or registration required. In case of bad weather, the back-up date is Feb 22.

New Planting Info for CoMO

Planting ChartIt’s hard to believe it on this particular snowy February day, but the ground is often ready for certain seeds and plants here in Mid-Missouri as early as March.

Check out this updated chart for the the best dates to plant seeds or transplants of various vegetables in our area.

As you start planning your 2014 garden, keep in mind that Boone County is in USDA cold hardiness zone 6a and AHS heat zone 7. Read more about what zone ratings mean in our post from 2012 when the USDA released the latest cold hardiness ratings map.

 

Garden How-to: Drip Irrigation

Fall and winter are a good time to make plans for improvements to your garden next year, like for instance improving how you water the garden. This past year, one community garden, with funding help from the CGC, purchased and installed drip irrigation lines to improve the efficiency of their group-run garden. If you’ve ever considered this kind of water delivery, check out this how-to video they made.

Gearing up for Garlic

As we finish putting our summer beds to rest and harvest our fall greens, it’s time to start thinking about the first planting for next season: garlic.

This hardy crop, planted in the fall for an early summer harvest, is easy to grow in Mid-Missouri. Just follow these few simple steps.

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